News

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DEC Announces $250,000 in Awards for Climate-adaptive Design studio municipal partners

June 2019

(Image by Thackston Crandall MLA’18 and Veronica Chan MLA’18, 2018 LA6020 Cornell Climate-adaptive Design Studio)

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s (DEC) Hudson River Estuary Program, in partnership with the New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission (NEIWPCC), today awarded contracts to create design and engineering plans for climate resilient and connected waterfront places in the city of Kingston and village of Piermont. Each of these communities participated in the Climate-Adaptive Design Studio, a program that links Cornell University graduate and undergraduate students in landscape architecture with flood-prone Hudson Riverfront communities to create design concepts that incorporate projections for sea-level rise and extreme weather. The designs encourage water-dependent use of shoreline property, provide public access to waterfronts, and use nature-based solutions for stormwater management and shoreline stability.

“The grant awards announced today will help these Hudson River communities bolster their resilience by designing innovative projects that maintain and enhance the ability of natural systems to reduce flood-risk and storm surge,” DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos said. “In the face of increasing flood risks and severe weather events, New York State is investing in our communities to preserve our natural resources and strengthen their ability to withstand flooding.”

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DEC Announces Fall 2019 Opportunity for a Hudson Municipality to Host the Climate-adaptive Design Studio

May 2019

(Image by Thackston Crandall MLA’18 and Veronica Chan MLA’18, 2018 LA6020 Cornell Climate-adaptive Design Studio)

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos: “This unique opportunity will help waterfront communities along the Hudson River bolster their resilience by designing innovative projects like floodable parks and flood-adapted buildings. To prepare New York’s waterfront communities for the challenges of our changing climate, DEC is partnering with design experts from Cornell and local experts on the ground to ready New Yorkers for the challenges posed by extreme weather events and sea-level rise on the tidal Hudson.”

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(Image by Xining Wan MLA’19 and Lixuan Li MLA’19, 2018 LA6020 Cornell Climate-adaptive Design Studio)

.The RFP seeks climate-adaptive design project development proposals from design firms, supported by a municipality that has worked with the Climate-adaptive Design studio

2019 Request for Proposals: Climate Adaptive Design Project Development

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(Photo by Libby Zemaitis)

Cerra’s Climate adaptive Design studio has been referenced in an RFP from NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, indicative of the potential for the Climate-adaptive Design studio to influence thinking about design and implementation of actual adaptation projects in New York State

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(Photo by Josh Cerra)

The studio links landscape architecture students with flood-risk Hudson Riverfront communities to explore design alternatives for more climate resilient, beautiful and connected waterfront areas.

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(Photo by Libby Zematis)

The studio links landscape architecture students with flood-risk Hudson Riverfront communities to explore design alternatives for more climate resilient, beautiful and connected waterfront areas.

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Village resident Klaus Jacobs, a research geologist at Columbia University, said the students’ work comes at a pivotal point: “Without those visions to get projects started, this would be basically impossible. This is a very crucial step in a long process that would be much harder if we hadn’t had [these ideas] from Cornell.”

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Graduate students Hong Gao, Luyao Kong and Qianli Feng received the prestigious award for Weaving the Waterfront, a design that combines climate-resilient programs and public spaces. The ASLA Awards recognize top work of landscape architecture students around the world.

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(Photo by Libby Zematis)

Cornell’s approach to conservation in the Hudson watershed has been to work with communities on their own terms and at their own pace. […] The approach has paid off in myriad ways. Of the 260 municipalities in the Hudson’s watershed, roughly half have partnered with Cornell…

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To keep riverfront communities intact in the face of rising waters due to climate change, landscape architecture master’s students at Cornell’s Climate-Adaptive Design (CAD) studio are sketching sturdy, flexible concepts for a city along New York’s Hudson River while factoring in the tide’s swell.